A month-long upkeep shutdown of the Orange Line is scheduled for Wednesday

Riders are being encouraged to work from home during an unprecedented 30-day total shutdown of the MBTA’s Orange Line as the agency tackles long-overdue maintenance issues. Gov. Charlie Baker and MBTA CEO Steve Poftak on Wednesday approved plans to suspend Orange Line service starting Aug. 19. 9 p.m. Services will resume on September 19. 5 o’clock high-profile incidents, including a fire that sent passengers jumping out of Orange Line train windows, and a Federal Transit Administration review that led to a long list of safety directives. Baker said the Orange Line plan was developed with input from LPS. “With the many initiatives that the T has planned over the years to address the Orange Line and LPS rail issues, we started a conversation with LPS about whether we should just go ahead and dedicate 30 days, get access to it 24/7 and continue,” the governor said. Baker said the 30-day suspension will allow the MBTA to complete work that would have taken five years under more conventional schedules.” Repairs along more than 3,500 feet of track will eliminate delays on the Orange Line and provide faster trips and safer rides. Baker said. “The closure will also allow the T to accelerate planned repairs and upgrades, such as replacing crossovers, installing upgraded signal systems and performing track maintenance beyond where the train carries passengers, all at the same time.” return, they will arrive at thoroughly cleaned stations and experience a much better ride than the one they left. And as the governor said, the fleet will consist mostly of new Orange Line cars,” Poftak said. The MBTA has agreed to purchase a new generation of train cars for the Orange and Red Lines in 2014. The first ones were introduced in 2017. and put into operation in 2019. For a variety of reasons, the new wagons have been in and out of service. More recently, engineers had to solve the problem of battery failure. Other cars in service on the Orange Line originally entered service between 1979 and 1981. At a Wednesday morning MBTA board of directors meeting, members voted unanimously in favor of the deal, which could be worth up to $37 million. $ with Yankee Line Inc. to provide shuttle buses during upcoming work on the Orange Line and part of the Green Line. In addition to shuttle buses, Baker and Poftak urged Orange Line riders to consider using Commuter Rail as an alternative during stoppages. They said fares 1A, 1 and 2 can be paid with a CharlieCard or CharlieBiliet. However, anyone who has the option is “strongly encouraged” to work from home. Additional plans are still in the works, officials said, including the possibility of pop-up bus lanes in Boston. Last week, the MBTA suspended plans to shut down a section of the Orange Line for a partial month to give officials more time to investigate whether additional work could be done during the extended shutdown. One of four safety directives issued by the Federal Transit Administration earlier this year singled out the section of the Orange Line south of Tufts Medical Center, which as of 2019 speed limits were in place. The MBTA used previous short-term shutdowns to install hundreds of feet of new track on the southbound Orange Line between the Back Bay and Massachusetts Avenue stations. The construction allowed the MBTA to eliminate the speed limit, which was about 1,500 feet long, increasing train speeds from 10 mph to 25 mph. According to the MBTA. According to statistics provided by the MBTA, in 2022 in May, the Orange Line averaged 102,358 weekday passengers. According to MBTA statistics, only the Red Line carries more passengers, averaging 129,050 customers on weekdays. . The Green Line averages 82,585 weekday passengers, while the Blue Line averages 27,732. MBTA ridership statistics as of 2016 “This closure will undoubtedly negatively impact our community, especially our residents who depend on the Orange Line to get to and from work and for our students to return to school,” said Malden Mayor Gary Christenson. Orange Line Closure Notice. “I have already met with our team to see if there is anything we can do to help with the situation, including using commuter rail to deal with the disruption. Installation of the Green Line train security system, projects that have already been completed on the B and C branches. The E Branch project is scheduled from August 6 to 21, while D Branch will be completed from September 24. until October 30 MBTA officials also said the railroad crossing between the Alewife and Davis stations on the Red Line would be rebuilt later in 2022, without specifying how many were closed. Boston Mayor Michelle Wu, who suggested last week that a longer shutdown of the MBTA could be critical to getting the system back on track, said it’s time to really address the issues. “We can’t keep putting band-aids on situations and trying to chew on the edges,” Wu said. “We have to make real corrections.” Wu is an Orange Line rider herself. “This is a very personal issue for me, and I want to make sure that we not only focus on what needs to be done, but that we do it quickly, thoroughly and comprehensively, which our residents deserve,” Wu said. operationally, you need to have alternatives that include shuttles or other options,” Wu said. “That’s where the city could be a real partner, and we’re going to work very closely with the MBTA and provide whatever support we can if that happens.”

Riders are being encouraged to work from home during an unprecedented 30-day total shutdown of the MBTA’s Orange Line as the agency tackles long-overdue maintenance issues.

Gov. Charlie Baker and MBTA CEO Steve Poftak on Wednesday approved plans to suspend Orange Line service starting Aug. 19. 9 p.m. Services will resume on September 19. 5 o’clock

The plan was announced after a number of high-profile incidents, including a fire that killed riders jumping out the windows of an Orange Line trainand a Federal Transit Administration Review this has resulted in a long list of safety directives. Baker said the Orange Line plan was developed with the participation of LPS.

“Because of the many initiatives the T has planned over the years to address the Orange Line rail issues and FTA, we started a conversation with FTA about whether we should just go ahead and do 30 days.” , get access to it 24/7 and go,” the governor said.

Baker said the 30-day shutdown will allow the MBTA to complete work that would have taken five years under more conventional schedules.

“The track repairs along more than 3,500 feet of track will eliminate delays on the Orange Line and provide faster trips and safer rides for riders,” Baker said. “The closure will also allow the T to accelerate planned repairs and upgrades, such as replacing crossovers, installing upgraded signal systems and performing track maintenance beyond where the train carries passengers, all at the same time.”

“When Orange Line riders return, they will arrive at thoroughly cleaned stations and experience a much better ride than the one they left.” And as the governor said, the fleet will consist mostly of new Orange Line cars,” Poftak said.

The MBTA has agreed to purchase a new generation of train cars for the Orange and Red lines in 2014. introduced in 2017 and began service in 2019.

New cars have been used and decommissioned for various reasons. More recently, engineers had to solve a battery failure.

Other Orange Line cars originally entered service between 1979 and 1981.

At a Wednesday morning MBTA board of directors meeting, members voted unanimously for up to $37 million. USD deal with Yankee Line Inc. to provide shuttle buses during the upcoming Orange Line and part of the Green Line work.

In addition to shuttle buses, Baker and Poftak urged Orange Line riders to consider using Commuter Rail as an alternative during stoppages. They said fares 1A, 1 and 2 can be paid with a CharlieCard or CharlieTicket.

However, anyone who has the option is “highly encouraged” to work from home.

Additional plans are still in the works, officials said, including the possibility of pop-up bus lanes in Boston.

Last week on the MBTA suspended plans for a partial shutdown for a month Sections of the Orange Line to give officials more time to investigate whether additional work could be done during a longer shutdown.

One of four safety directives issued by the Federal Transit Administration earlier this year highlighted the section of the Orange Line south of Tufts Medical Center, which will be closed starting in 2019. speed limits were in place.

The MBTA used previous short-term shutdowns to install hundreds of feet of new track on the southbound Orange Line tracks between the Back Bay and Massachusetts Avenue stations. The construction allowed the MBTA to eliminate the speed limit, which was about 1,500 feet long, increasing train speeds from 10 mph to 25 mph.

“Once all track work is completed in this area, speeds will be increased to 40 mph,” the MBTA said.

According to statistics provided by the MBTA, in 2022 in May, the Orange Line averaged 102,358 weekday passengers.

Only the Red Line carries more passengers, averaging 129,050 customers on weekdays, MBTA statistics show. On weekdays, the Green Line carries an average of 82,585 passengers, while the Blue Line carries 27,732.

MBTA ridership statistics from 2016

“This closure will undoubtedly negatively impact our community, especially our residents who ride the Orange Line to and from work, as well as our students returning to school,” said Malden Mayor Gary Christenson. statement in response to the Orange Line closure announcement. “I have already met with our team to see if there is anything we can do to improve the situation, including using commuter rail to compensate for the disruption.

Green Line riders using the E and D branches will also face upcoming shutdowns due to track work and the installation of the Green Line’s train protection system, projects that have already been completed on the B and C branches. The E Branch project is scheduled for August 6-21, while the D Branch will run from September 24 to October 30.

MBTA officials also said the railroad crossing between the Alewife and Davis stations on the Red Line will be rebuilt later in 2022. The extent of any closures was not specified.

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu, who said last week that a longer shutdown of the MBTA could be a key factor in getting the system back on track, said it’s time to really address the issues.

“We can’t keep putting band-aids on situations and trying to chew on the edges,” Wu said. “We need to make real corrections.”

Wu is an Orange Line rider herself.

“This is a very personal issue for me, and I want to make sure that we not only focus on what needs to be done, but that we do it quickly, thoroughly and comprehensively, which our residents deserve,” Wu said.

“Any service disruption needs to have alternatives that involve shuttles or other options,” Wu said. “That’s where the city could be a real partner, and we’re going to work very closely with the MBTA and provide whatever support we can if that happens.”

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